Oil & Gas History News, November 2020

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November 18, 2020  –  Oil & Gas History News, Vol. 1, No. 11

 

Oil & Gas History News

 

Our November newsletter features more petroleum history milestones, including when America first exported oil (and kerosene), some oil seeps at a Pennsylvania creek, a gasoline-powered Locomobile, and the advertising history of Joe Roughneck. This month’s featured image is related to the world’s first offshore well drilled out of sight of land. Thanks again for subscribing — and please share these articles exploring the evolution of the energy industry.

 

This Week in Petroleum History Monthly Update

 

Links to summaries from four weeks of U.S. oil and natural gas history, including new technologies, oilfield discoveries, petroleum products, and pioneers. 

 

November 19, 1861 – American exports Oil for First Time

 

America exported petroleum during the Civil War when the merchant brig Elizabeth Watts departed Philadelphia for London. No ship had ever crossed the Atlantic bearing such cargo. Forty-five days later, the Union vessel arrived at Victoria Dock carrying 901 barrels of Pennsylvania oil and 428 barrels of kerosene…MORE 

 

November 10, 1854 – Oil Seeps inspire First American Oil Well

 

The U.S. petroleum industry began when a lumber company sold 105 acres along a Pennsylvania creek known for having oil seeps. The buyer, George Bissell of New Hampshire, was interested in drilling for what was then known as “rock oil.” He had learned from a Yale professor that oil could be refined into the popular lamp fuel kerosene…MORE 

 

November 2, 1902 – First Gas-Powered Locomobile delivered

 

Previously known for building expensive, steam-powered automobiles, the Locomobile Company of America delivered its first gasoline-powered Locomobile to a customer in New York City. The company had hired Andrew Riker, a self-taught engineer and racecar driver, to create the four-cylinder, 12-horsepower vehicle, which sold for $4,000…MORE 

 

October 26, 1970 – Joe Roughneck Statue dedicated in Texas

 

Governor Preston Smith dedicated a Joe Roughneck statue in Boonsville, Texas, to mark the 20th anniversary of a giant natural gas field discovery. Lone Star Gas Company’s Vaught No. 1 well had revealed the field. Joe Roughneck first appeared as the advertising face of tubular goods manufacturer Lone Star Steel before becoming an industry award in 1955…MORE 

 

Featured Image

Offshore Bell Helicopter 1954 AOGHS

The first use of helicopters for offshore platforms was at the request of Kerr-McGee and Humble Oil. Bell Helicopters soon formed Petroleum Bell Helicopters Company, which advertised in U.S. News and World Report with this image in 1954.

 

The modern offshore industry began on November 14, 1947, in the Gulf of Mexico with the first oil well completed out of sight of land. Brown & Root Company built the freestanding platform 10 miles offshore for Kerr-McGee and partners Phillips Petroleum and Stanolind. The Kermac No. 16 could withstand winds as high as 125 miles per hour at a time when no equipment specifically designed for offshore drilling yet existed. See Offshore Petroleum History.

 

Energy Education Articles

 

Updated editorial content on the American Oil & Gas Historical Society website includes these articles:

 

In 1905, two years before Oklahoma statehood, the Glenn Pool (or Glenpool) oilfield was discovered in the Creek Indian Reservation south of Tulsa. The Ida Glenn No. 1 well, drilled 1,500 feet deep, led to more prolific wells in the 12-square-mile Glenn Pool. By the time of statehood, the oilfield would be helping make Tulsa the the “Oil Capital of the World.” 

 

An 1899 article in the New York World profiled Mrs. Byron Alford – the “Only Woman in the World who Owns and Operates a Dynamite Factory.” Drillers used the explosives for “shooting” wells to boost oil production. Mrs. Alford’s Nitro Factory operated on five acres outside of Bradford, Pennsylvania, with daily production of 3,000 pounds of nitroglycerin and 6,000 pounds of dynamite. 


Samuel “Golden Rule” Jones in 1894 patented a sucker rod design for Acme Sucker Rod Company, which he had founded in 1892 in Toledo, Ohio. With his “Coupling for Pipes or Rods,” Jones solved the frequent and time-consuming problem of broken sucker rods. The future four-time Toledo mayor became known as “Golden Rule” Jones of Ohio by creating a better workplace for employees at his factory.

 

 

Petroleum history provides an important context for understanding how the nation will meet its future energy needs. AOGHS provides a communication network for museums, researchers, teachers and students. Subscribers like you — and donations — help make this possible, so continue to visit and support the website.

 

— Bruce Wells

 
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“Any survey of the natural resources used as sources of energy must include a discussion about the importance of oil, the lifeblood of all industrialized nations.” — Daniel Yergin, bestselling author and winner of the Pulitzer Prize

 

_______________________

 

The American Oil & Gas Historical Society preserves U.S. petroleum history. Become an AOGHS supporting member and help maintain this energy education website and expand historical research. For more information, contact bawells@aoghs.org. Copyright © 2020 Bruce A. Wells. All rights reserved.

Cool Coolspring Power Museum

Exhibits in the rustic hills of western Pennsylvania preserve a remarkable mechanical history of America.

 

A collection of buildings, artifacts, and outdoor engine exhibits are part of an unusual museum that can be found near Little Sandy Creek, just off Colonel Drake highway 36, about 10 miles northwest of Punxsutawney.

An impressive collection of historic engines, many of them lovingly restored and maintained by volunteers, educates visitors about the evolution of internal combustion engine technology that put an end to the age of steam. The Cool Spring Power Museum’s long-time director spent decades collecting and preserving hundreds of historic engines of all shapes and sizes. In a 2004 interview, Dr. Paul E. Harvey explained why the collection was important.

Interior of Coolspring Power Museum with many one-cylinder egines.

The Coolspring Power Museum opened in 1985 near Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. It has the largest collection of historically significant stationary gas engines in the country, if the not the world. Photo courtesy Coolspring Power Museum.

“Internal combustion engines revolutionized the world around the turn of the 20th century in much the same way that steam engines did a century before,” noted Dr. Harvey, who co-founded the museum in 1985 about midway between between Punxsutawney and Brookville, Pennsylvania.

“One has only to imagine a coal-fired, steam-powered, airplane to realize how important internal combustion was to the industrialized world,” added Dr. Harvey, a medical doctor.

Coolspring Power Museum sign at museum.

The museum hosts many summer events, including a “History Day and Car, Truck & Tractor Show.” Photo by Bruce Wells.

According to Dr. Harvey, permanent exhibits at Coolspring include stationary gas “hit and miss” engines, throttle governed engines, flame ignition engines, hot tube ignition engines, and hot air engines ranging in size from a fractional horsepower up to 600 horsepower.

Many engine enthusiasts from around the country have sent significant pieces for display, he said. The grounds, as well as semi-annual shows, have expanded with visitors from Maine to California, as well as Canada and England. Dr. Harvey explained that early internal combustion engines produced only a few horsepower and could not replace steam engines in most applications, but by 1890 they were powerful enough for most portable or remote operations as well as many small manufacturers.

By 1900 the new power technology was replacing reciprocating steam engines for electric generation, Dr. Harvey noted. “By 1915 they were being considered for all but the largest installations where steam turbines have since dominated,” he added. Dr. Harvey and fellow enthusiast John Wilcox began collecting engines in the 1950s. Their collections were the basis of displays that would greatly multiply.

The museum is housed in 20 buildings that, besides its own large collection, contain many pieces placed there on loan. Dr. Harvey said the purpose of Coolspring was “to be the foremost collection of early internal combustion technology presented in an educational and visitor-oriented manner and to provide an operation that will gain support and generate substantial growth.”

Paul Harvey, co-founder of the Coolspring Power Museum in Pennsylvania, stands next to the 175 HP Otto engine.

Dr. Paul Harvey, co-founder of the Coolspring Power Museum in Pennsylvania, stands next to the 175 HP Otto engine he restored with the help of the museum’s many dedicated volunteers. Photo courtesy the Coolspring Power Museum.

The collection documents the early history of the internal combustion revolution. Almost all of the critical components of today’s engines have their origins in the period represented by the collection (as well as hundreds of innovations no longer used). Some of the engines represent real engineering progress; others are more the product of inventive minds avoiding previous patents. All tell a story.

Although the museum’s focus is on stationary engines (with perhaps the largest collection in the world), Dr. Harvey explained that no museum of internal combustion engines would be complete without at least a few vehicles in its collection. Among the antique heavy trucks and semis, is a rare petroleum well service rig. The Hanley & Bird Well Bailing Machine was designed to clean a well by lifting water, sand, and debris from the bottom of the well using a “bailer” attached to a cable, noted the museum director.

A Hanley and Bird Well Bailing Machine at the Coolspring Power Museum.

A “last of its kind” Hanley & Bird Well Bailing Machine from the Pennsylvania oilfields. Photo courtesy Coolspring Power Museum.

Five of the devices were built; the Coolspring Power Museum’s example is the only one to survive. “It was donated to the museum by EXCO Resources, the successor to H&B,” Dr. Harveys said. “It is very interesting as it uses a chain drive Mack rear end and a Ford front axle.”

Dr. Harvey recalled seeing the Hanley & Bird Well Bailing Machine driving through Coolspring on its way to service local natural gas wells. He said that the museum today displays it with the mast raised and ready to work. “It certainly shows the ingenuity of the local gas industry,” he reported.

The Coolspring Power Museum collection includes many engines used to power multiple wells in America’s first oilfields. The museum is off Route 36 midway between Punxsutawney and Brookville in western Pennsylvania. Just as the steam engines revolutionized the world in the 1800s, the internal combustion engines on exhibit at the Coolspring Power Museum did the same at the start of the 20th century, according to Dr. Harvey.

“You have only to imagine a coal-fired, steam-powered, airplane to realize how important internal combustion was to the industrialized world,” the doctor added with a chuckle. The Coolspring Power Museum hosts events in the spring and summer, including the popular “History Day and Car, Truck & Tractor Show.”

______________________________

The American Oil & Gas Historical Society preserves U.S. petroleum history. Become an AOGHS supporting member and help maintain this energy education website and expand historical research. For more information, contact bawells@aoghs.org. Copyright © 2020 Bruce A. Wells. All rights reserved.

Citation Information: Article Title: “Cool Coolspring Power Museum.” Author: Aoghs.org Editors. Website Name: American Oil & Gas Historical Society. URL: https://aoghs.org/energy-education-resources/cool-coolspring-power-museum. Last Updated: September 17, 2019. Original Published Date: September 1, 2005.

 

Edwin Drake and his Oil Well

Oil patch historian pens outstanding biography in Myth, Legend, Reality – Edwin Laurentine Drake and the Early Oil Industry

 

The man who would create the American petroleum industry was down to his last few pennies in August 1859. A letter was on its way from the company that had hired him to drill a well in Titusville, Pennsylvania. The letter instructed him to close operations.

“As far as the company was concerned, the project was finished,” noted William Brice, PhD, in his detailed 2009 biography of Edwin L. Drake. “Fortunately that letter was not delivered until after they found oil.”

Cover of Edwin Drake biography by William Brice.On Saturday afternoon on August 27, at a depth of 69.5 feet, the drill bit had dropped into a crevice, Brice notes. Late the following afternoon Drake’s driller, “Uncle Billy” Smith, visited the site “and noticed a very dark liquid floating on top of the water in the hole, which, when sampled, turned out to be oil.” Drake’s Folly, as it was known to locals, was not such a folly after all, “for Drake had shown that large quantities of oil could be found by drilling into the earth. And so began the modern petroleum industry,” 

Commissioned in 2007 by the Oil Region Alliance in Oil City, Pa., to write a new Drake biography, Brice, professor emeritus in geology and planetary science at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, published his 661-page Myth, Legend, Reality – Edwin Laurentine Drake and the Early Oil Industry.

The book, part of the 2009 celebration of the 150th anniversary of America’s first oil well, includes more than 200 pages of reference material and dozens of rare images. “Bill dug through the history related to Drake as no one has before, and the result is a much more complete picture of the man, his family and his accomplishments,” proclaimed geologist and editor of the Oilfield Journal Kathy J. Flaherty.

Myth, Legend, Reality – Edwin L. Drake and the Early Oil Industry is a well-written account of Drake and his times — and the history and significance of his 1859 discovery,” added Bruce Wells of the American Oil & Gas Historical Society. “Bill Brice provides the careful research needed to sort out the nonsense and brilliance of the man who established the American petroleum industry.”

A Johnstown resident, Pennsylvania, Brice was on the Pitt-Johnstown faculty from 1971 through 2005 and was a visiting professor in earth and atmospheric sciences at Cornell University from 1976 to 2002. Brice received the Distinguished Service Award from the History of Geology Division of the Geological Society of America in 2008. He has been president of the Petroleum History Institute and editor of its journal, Oil-Industry History.

“August 27, 1859, is one of those dates on which the world changed, Brice proclaimed in 2009. “Edwin Drake’s quest to find oil by drilling was a success, and the modern oil and gas industry took a giant leap forward. Even though the use of petroleum dates back to the first human civilizations, the events of that Saturday afternoon along the banks of Oil Creek near Titusville, Pennsylvania, provided the spark that propelled the petroleum industry toward the future.”

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_______________________________

The American Oil & Gas Historical Society preserves U.S. petroleum history. Become an AOGHS supporting member and help maintain this energy education website and expand historical research. For more information, contact bawells@aoghs.org. © 2020 Bruce A. Wells. All rights reserved.

Citation Information – Article Title: “Edwin Drake and his Oil Well.” Author: Aoghs.org Editors. Website Name: American Oil & Gas Historical Society. URL: https://aoghs.org/energy-education-resources/edwin-l-drake-oil-well. Last Updated: June 4, 2018. Original Published Date: August 1, 2009.

 

Oil & Gas History News, October 2020

AOGHS logo Newsletter

October 21, 2020  –  Oil & Gas History News, Vol. 1, No. 10

 

Oil & Gas History News

 

Welcome to our latest spotlight on U.S. petroleum history. October’s newsletter illuminates important petroleum milestones, including the 50th anniversary of a sleek, natural gas powered rocket car setting the world land speed record; the 90th anniversary of the discovery of the 140,000 acre East Texas oilfield; and the 103rd anniversary of the “Roaring Ranger” oilfield discovery, which allowed the Allies to “float to victory on a wave of oil” in World War I.

 

This Week in Petroleum History Monthly Update

 

Links to summaries from five weeks of U.S. oil and natural gas history, including new technologies, oilfield discoveries, petroleum products, and pioneers. 

 

October 19, 1990 – First Emergency Use of Strategic Petroleum Reserve

 

As world oil prices spiked after the August 1990 invasion of Kuwait by Saddam Hussein’s Iraqi troops, the first presidentially mandated emergency use of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve was authorized by President George H. W. Bush, who ordered the sale of five million barrels of SPR oil as a test…MORE 

 

October 13, 1954 – First Arizona Oil Well

 

Arizona became the 30th petroleum producing state when Shell Oil Company completed its East Boundary Butte No. 2 well one mile south of the Utah border on Apache County’s Navajo Indian Reservation. The well indicated natural gas production of 3,150 thousand cubic feet per day…MORE 

October 5, 1915 – Science of Petroleum Geology reveals Oilfield

 

Using a careful study of geology for finding oil led to the discovery of a major Mid-Continent field. Drilled by Wichita Natural Gas Company, a subsidiary of Cities Service Company, the well revealed the 34-square-mile El Dorado oilfield in central Kansas…MORE 

 

September 28, 1945 – Truman claims America’s Outer Continental Shelf

 

President Harry Truman extended U.S. jurisdiction over the natural resources of the outer continental shelf, placing them under the control of the Secretary of the Interior. In August 1953, Truman’s edict would become the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act…MORE 

 

September 21, 1901 – First Louisiana Oil Well

 

Just nine months after the January 1901 “Lucas Gusher” at Spindletop, Texas, another historic oilfield was revealed 90 miles east in Louisiana. W. Scott Heywood – already successful thanks to wells drilled on Spindletop Hill – completed a well that produced 7,000 barrels of oil a day…MORE 

 

Featured Image

Daisy Bradford Well 1930 AOGHS

In East Texas, with a crowd of more than 4,000 landowners, leaseholders and others watching, the Daisy Bradford No. 3 well was “shot” with nitroglycerin near Kilgore, Texas, on October 3, 1930. Geologists later would be stunned when it became apparent the well on the widow Bradford’s farm – along with two other wells far to the north – proved to be part of the same oil-producing formation (the Woodbine) encompassing more than 140,000 acres. See East Texas Oilfield Discovery.

 

Energy Education Articles

 

Updated editorial content on the American Oil & Gas Historical Society website includes these articles:

 

Powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) and hydrogen peroxide 50 years ago on October 23, 1970, the Blue Flame set a new world land speed record of 630.388 miles per hour. Sponsored by the American Gas Association, the 38-foot-long, 4,950-pound rocket car set the record at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, as the industry proclaimed natural gas “the fuel of the future.” The Blue Flame land speed record would remain unbroken more than a decade. See Blue Flame Natural Gas Rocket Car.

 

On October 17, 1917, “Roaring Ranger,” a wildcat well between Abilene and Dallas, launched a Texas drilling boom that helped fuel the Allied victory of World War I. The J. H. McCleskey No. 1 well erupted oil about two miles south of the small town of Ranger, which had been founded in the 1870s near a Texas Ranger camp in Eastland County. See Roaring Ranger wins WWI.

 

Thanks to a growing number of subscribers, the American Oil & Gas Historical Society continues to expand its public outreach during these difficult times. The AOGHS website is building a network linking energy educators, researchers, community museums, historians, news media, and especially students. You can help by forwarding this newsletter to your friends. And if you have a company website, please consider adding a link to the AOGHS home page. Thank you again for subscribing.

— Bruce Wells

 
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“Any survey of the natural resources used as sources of energy must include a discussion about the importance of oil, the lifeblood of all industrialized nations.” — Daniel Yergin, bestselling author and winner of the Pulitzer Prize

_______________________________

The American Oil & Gas Historical Society preserves U.S. petroleum history. Become an AOGHS supporting member and help maintain this energy education website and expand historical research. For more information, contact bawells@aoghs.org. © 2020 Bruce A. Wells. All rights reserved.

Million Barrel Museum

First an experimental 1928 concrete reservoir for Permian Basin oil, then a water park for a day.

Tourists traveling on I-20 in West Texas should not miss the Monahans oil museum in the heart of the Permian Basin. Not just a petroleum-related museum, it is a Million Barrel Museum whose main attraction is an elliptical cement oil tank the size of three football fields.

The Permian Basin was once known as a “petroleum graveyard” until a series of successful wells beginning in 1920 brought exploration companies to the arid region. The Santa Rita No. 1 well alone would endow the University of Texas with millions of dollars.

Monahans oil museum concrete tank seen from above.

The Million Barrel Museum’s 525 foot by 422 foot main attraction, originally built to store Permian Basin oil in 1928, became a water park for just one day in 1958. Photo courtesy Top of Texas Gazette.

Lack of infrastructure for storing and transporting the large volumes of oil proved to be a major problem. “There were great oil discoveries around 1926 and few places to put the oil. No pipelines or tanks,” explained Elizabeth Heath, chairwoman of the Ward County Historical Commission, in 2010. A single well in the Hendricks field could produce 500 barrels of oil a day.

Exhibits at the Monahan, TX, million barrel museum include a Gulf station

In Monahans, Texas, the Million Barrel Museum tells the story of how a lack of pipelines during 1920s West Texas oil discoveries led to the construction of a massive concrete tank. Photo courtesy Texas Historical Commission.

“Unfortunately, the Roxana Petroleum Company – later absorbed by Shell Oil – did not have a pipeline to get all that oil to a refinery,” added journalist Mike Cox in his 2006 “Texas Tales” column. To solve the problem, the company decided to build a giant concrete reservoir. Using mule-drawn equipment, workers completed an excavation and laid wire mesh over the packed earth, Cox explained. Contractors then started pouring tons of concrete.

monahans oil museum Texas map

Founded in 1881, Monahans incorporated two years after oil was discovered in 1926.

“By late April 1928 workers hammered away at a wooden cover for the colossal tank, placing creosote-soaked support timbers at 14 foot intervals across the sprawling reservoir floor,” Cox reported. The timbers supported a domed redwood roof covered with tar paper. Completion of the walls, pillars and roof took just three months because construction took place 24 hours a day. (more…)

Library of Mid-Continent Well Data

Preserving the foundation of Oklahoma petroleum exploration and production history.

 

Looking for hand-drawn geologic strip-log records of structure features and detail about rocks, sands, clays, shales, and other formations? Carefully filed in rows of cabinets, a library of mid-continent well data benefits the Oklahoma petroleum industry. The Mid-Continent Geological Library (MCGL) collection preserves well data. It holds eons of geologic history.

Editor’s Update (2020) – The geological library, with its more than 211,000 proprietary, hand-written scout tickets dating from the early 1900s into the 1950s, relocated from downtown Oklahoma City to nearby Edmond. Visit the collection at 3409 S. Broadway, No. 804, Edmond, OK 73013.

Established in 1966, the geological library is owned and operated by the Oklahoma City Geological Society. The facility offers researchers thousands of easily accessible geological histories; its growing digital archive is the premier repository for mid-continent well logs.

Mid-Continent Geological Library 2017 CEO Mike Harris describes log recrords.s.

Past library CEO Mike Harris in 2017 explained a typical log documenting a well and could unfold to many feet, depending on drilled depth. Photos by Bruce Wells.

Recent History

Thanks to the Oklahoma City Geological Society (OCGS), which began the extensive collection in the 1960s, the geological library first moved from Oklahoma City’s First National Center to a site on 6th Street in January 2015. The society also began the legal process of making the library independent, according to former MCGL CEO Mike Harris in a September 2017 interview. That summer, MCGL officially became a 501(c)(3) separate organization.

OCGS members continue to support and give historic records to the library. The collection of well log histories has resulted from a long-standing arrangement with the state of Oklahoma. By 2020, the library had been moved to a larger location in Edmond.

Detail of files in the Mid-Continent Geological Library.

A MCGL drawer containing strip/sample logs. These are filed in section, township and range (congressional grid) order.

Well logs submitted by operators to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission for required public release are provided to MCGL on a biweekly basis. On behalf of the state, MCGL staff scans the newly released logs, which also are printed and filed in the library’s log files, where they are available to library members and other users. Lists of released logs are posted online after processing. CDs containing log images are returned to state officials.

Importantly, new well log data files are immediately uploaded to the MCGL digital library where subscribers are able to view and download them. “This is well before they can be accessed from commercial services or the state,” Harris explained. That is a benefit of library membership.

 Historic Oklahoma oilfield photos are on display in the Mid-Continent Geological Library.

The MCGL collection includes digital files, audio-visual facilities, and many images depicting Oklahoma petroleum history, which began a decade before statehood in 1907.

The well log library originated in 1966 when several OCGS geologists acquired a private collection. It now operates autonomously from the geological society, allowing more of the general public to explore the collection. “Anyone can be a member of the library,” noted Harris. “It is a public resource. As a not-for-profit, anyone who wants to pay the dues can have access to the facility’s information.” 

Access to Geological Records

Accessibility is a key part of MCGL mission of collecting, preserving and archiving geological data. Online researchers must buy a subscription, which helps fund operations and on-going development the MCGL Digital Library. The influx of well data and other information is continuous, which adds value. Exploration companies frequently have their geologists join to gain early access.

Volumes of donated historical well data that has been given to the Mid-Continent Geological Library in Oklahoma City.

Just a portion of the “significant volume of donated historical well data that has been given to the library,” noted Mike Harris in 2017. Many student volunteers would be needed to review the material.

This closely kept well information was once gathered by a special kind of oilfield detectives who first made their appearance soon after the Civil War. Further, “the well scout was an individual who would meet with well scouts from other companies to exchange information on wells being drilled,” explained Harris. “You can’t have too much information.”

Cabinets hold manually-typed and handwritten sheets of “Scout Tickets. Work areas for research share space for MCGL part-time staff, who regularly perform document scanning and indexing for preservation.

Detail of a hand-drawn strip log oil and gas well record.

A hand-drawn strip log records various structure features and type of rocks, clays, shales, and formations.

The geological data library also includes reference materials, documents, journals, and maps. Some of the older maps are remarkably detailed — hand drawn and colored, often many years ago by independent geologists. There are storage areas for boxes of documents and artifacts donated to the library. Each must be carefully sorted through by a staff member or volunteer.

Many of the boxes of donated materials come from the families of petroleum geologists who have passed away. The contents can vary, but there often are records that should be preserved. “These are just a portion of the significant volume of donated historical well data that has been given to the library,” reported Harris. “Our members volunteer their time to go through the materials to determine what should be added to our collection.”

Opening the boxes themselves can become a discovery process, hand-drawn strip log record added, noting, “we often find unique and one-of-a-kind documents.”

Prior to the move to Edmond, material was housed in the former home of the Oklahoma Cotton Growers Association, the building was built in 1923 with two floors and a full basement. Large, slanted glass windows in the roof (uncovered during renovation) once helped illuminate bales of cotton for consistent evaluation and pricing.

Exterior of Mid-Continent Geological Library in Oklahoma City.

The former MCGL building in Oklahoma City was the revovated 1923 home of the Oklahoma Cotton Growers Association. Photo by Bruce Wells

The OCGS is an affiliate member of the Mid-Continent Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG). Devon Energy, with its 50-story, $750 million headquarters located nearby, contributed $1 million to the original OCGS Capital Campaign and secured naming rights for the library’s renovated building, the OCGS Devon Geoscience Center.

_________________________

The American Oil & Gas Historical Society preserves U.S. petroleum history. Become an AOGHS supporting member and help maintain this energy education website and expand historical research. For more information, contact bawells@aoghs.org. Copyright © 2020 Bruce A. Wells. All rights reserved.

Citation Information — Article Title: “Library of Mid-Continent Well Data.” Author: Aoghs.org Editors. Website Name: American Oil & Gas Historical Society. URL: https://www.aoghs.org/energy-education-resources/mid-continent-geological-library. Last Updated: October 6, 2020. Original Published Date: October 30, 2017.

 

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